Stay safe this July 4 – Fireworks Safety & Tips!

uly 4th is a great time to meet family and take vacations. One of the big parts of July 4th Celebrations is fireworks. Despite the dangers of fireworks, few people understand the associated risks — devastating burns, other injuries, fires, and even death.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) continues to urge families NOT to buy fireworks for their own or their children’s use, as thousands of people, most often children and teens, are injured each year while using consumer fireworks. 

Here are some of the safety tips to follow for families this July 4 and immediate treatment for burns tip.

 

Fireworks Safety Tips for Families:

Immediate Treatment for Burns:

  1. As quickly as possible, soak the burn in cool water. Don’t hesitate to run cool water over the burn long enough to cool the area and relieve the pain immediately after the injury. Do not use ice on a burn. It may delay healing. Also, do not rub a burn; it can increase blistering.
  2. Cool any smoldering clothing immediately by soaking with water, then remove any clothing from the burned area unless it is stuck firmly to the skin. In that case, cut away as much clothing as possible.
  3. If the injured area is not oozing, cover the burn with a sterile gauze pad or a clean, dry cloth.
  4. If the burn is oozing, cover it lightly with sterile gauze if available and immediately seek medical attention. If sterile gauze is not available, cover burns with a clean sheet or towel.
  5. Do not put butter, grease, or powder on a burn. All of these so-called home remedies actually can make the injury worse. For anything more serious than a superficial burn, or if redness and pain continue for more than a few hours, consult a physician. All electrical burns and burns of the hands, mouth, or genitals should receive immediate medical attention. Chemicals that cause burns also may be absorbed through the skin and cause other symptoms. Call the Poison Help Line (1-800-222-1222) or your pediatrician after washing off all the chemicals.

If your pediatrician thinks the burn is not too serious, he or she may show you how to clean and care for it at home using medicated ointments and dressings. When treating a burn at home, watch for any increase in redness or swelling or the development of a bad odor or discharge. These can be signs of infection, which will require medical attention. See First Aid for Burns: Parent FAQs for more information

View more July 4 Safety Tips: HealthyChildren.org

View Burn Treatment & Safety Tips: HealthyChildren.org

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